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between house speaker boehner and president obama. with stephen moore of the "wall street journal" and later the author of "columbine" and what we have learned from that tragedy and how it applies to the shooting in connecticut. >> i called on congress today to act immediately on what is appropriate to put armed police officers in every single school in this nation. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> the headline in this morning's baltimore sun reflects those across the country. from the tribune's washington magazine, it's said when he weight in friday he delivered a lashing speech that included violent movies and video games as he said his plan would train those to guard our schools. in this edition of today's program, we're going to begin the first 45 minutes of the program to talk about the nra's response to the shootings. they broke their silence yesterday with executive director and vice president wayne. we'll talk more about what he had to say. but we want to get you involved in the conversation
:15 p.m., singer and song writer, james taylor. host: stephen dinan is politics editor with the washington times and he is here to talk to us about the fiscal cliff. what's next? so let's get to it. on friday you had the lead story with the headline boehner's plan fails to win over g.o.p. the collapse is a serious blow to house speaker john boehner who hoped to gain leverage in his discussion with president obama and signals conservative republicans are unwilling to stomach any rise in tax rates even on those making more than $1 million which was mr. boehner's plan. so walk us through what happened on friday. how did we get there? and it seems like the speaker of the house didn't see this coming, and a lot of folks in washington want to know why not? guest: we begin the week with the speaker of the house saying negotiations between he and president obama had stalled. they were stuck on their -- i guess i would say maybe not their final offers but current offers. boehner said he would raise taxes on those making a million a year or more and get all told $1 trillion in ta
: stephen dinan was the the politics editor at the washington times. he covered the legislature in virginia. he has a bachelor's from the university of virginia. in the new york times this morning, there was an article with the headline, boehner finds the speaker's chair can be lonely. republicans fell 20 votes short of those needed to pass mr. boehner's bill that would make permanent musharraf tax cuts for households under $1 million per year -- make permanent the bush tax cuts for households under $1 million per year. the republican team could not bring enough members on board even though many of those who declined to support the measure told republican leadership that they secretly hoped it would pass. ixion's like some of these guys -- the speaker and the majority -- it sounds like some of these guys who the speaker and the majority leader thought they had the support of were talking out of both sides of their mouths. yes and they were hoping they would not have to take the -- guest: they were hoping they would not have to take the that vote to make this go away. in some ways, it is bad
at the in san francisco. today, dr. hansen is receiving the 2012 stephen schneider award for outstanding climate science climate one. stephen schneider was a who was involved in the formation of climate one that[applause] sandy. new york? to place it in a modern context, we have to turn to proxy data like coral and ice to piece together the puzzle of how the climate buried in the distant past. it showed it was relatively warm. it was about a thousand years ago. recently that exceeded anything we have seen. it was featured in the summary for policy makers in 2001. when it became an icon, those who find the science inconvenient saw the need to try to discredit this graph. they saw discrediting me as a way to do that. some have been attacked for the work they have done. i was also bill of five. my book tells the story of what it is like to be a scientist and find yourself in voluntary and accidental public figure. i was put in the limelight in limelight. [laughter] stick metaphor -- >> yes. that, if we as scientists are talking to the right people. reflag that we would not tell you but for fear tha
to depart the special mission without ambassador stephen came after repeated efforts of many security agents to find him in a smoke-filled the building still on fire. it was precipitated by second armed attack on the compound from the south. on the night of the attacks, tripoli and washington communicated in coordinated effectively with each other. the loop in the military right away and in your agency response was timely and appropriate, but there was simply not enough time ford military forces to have made a difference. having said that, it is not reasonable nor feasible to tether u.s. forces at the ready to respond to protect every high risk proposed in the world. we found there was no immediate tactical warning of the september 11 attacks, but there was the knowledge gap and the intelligence community understanding of extremist militia and libya and the potential threat they pose. although some threats were known. in this context, increased violence and targeting of foreign diplomats have failed to come in to clear relief against the backdrop of an effect of local governments, widespread
, next. stephen ohlemacher will join us, followed by roundtable discussion. first news update from c-span radio. >> its data clock 33 eastern. defense secretary leon panetta is in afghanistan today. in remarks to about 100 u.s. service members inside an aircraft hangar at a desert base, he thanked them for their service and emphasized that the u.s. is winding down its involvement in the war. he also said that president obama will decide in the next few weeks how many u.s. troops will stay in afghanistan after the combat mission ends in december of 2014. there are currently 56,000 u.s. troops there. north koreans dancing in the streets of their capital today after the regime successfully fired a long-range rockets, defying international warnings. gallants is likely to bring fresh sanctions and other punishment from the u.s. and its allies, which were quick to condemn its asked a test a technology for a missile that could attack the u.s. mainland. p'yongyang says it was merely a peaceful efforts to put a satellite into orbit. national security council spokesman is calling the launch "a
, dr. hansen is receiving the 2012 stephen schneider award for outstanding climate science communication bestowed by climate one. stephen schneider was a pioneering scientist at stanford who was involved in the formation of climate one that which is a sustainability initiative at the commonwealth club. so please welcome, dr. hansen to climate one. [applause] dr. hansen, welcome back. it's been two years since you were here. i'd like to begin with hurricane sandy. you are a teacher at columbia, you live in manhattan, where were you when sandy was approaching and when sandy hit new york? >> i was on our farm in kintnersville, pennsylvania, where we ended up losing power for better part of the week, and four big trees blown over, the railings blown off our deck and windows blown out of the barn. so even in pennsylvania, which is separated from the atlantic ocean by new jersey, we still -- >> thanks, new jersey. >> new jersey didn't do much to buffer it. but that's where i was. and we -- you know, the lights went out and we heard these noises on the second floor as the -- as th
would you feel? >> just on the j.f.k. assassination thing. i just read one of stephen king's new books which is about the assassination and a man who has the ability to go back in time and tries to stop the assassination of j.f.k. does that mean we should put a thing on the front and say this didn't happen? at what point is it someone's responsibility to find out whether there is a backing up of that argument. it seems ridiculous when it's about time travel because there is no time travel yet. to a lot of people that would be absurd, where is that line? it's a gray area. >> i think the answer to somebody who will look at -- watch "24" and say see didn't i tell you americans are torture mongers. it goes to the old question of what is the effect, what's the cause and what's the effect of art and on public perception and behavior. would i personally feel responsible? i thought about it and i do think we all bear some responsibility but not complete responsibility. so somebody who doesn't have a critical capacity to turn on a television and realize this is fiction, this is not a representa
for chris stephens and for the united states, their great -- gratitude for our country provide, i think, a measure of hope. that demonstration of afiction for america and for our envoy who gave his life for those people summed up exactly why we must not look inwards and walk away. finally, let me just say that what happened in benghazi really can't be seen in isolation. there's a truth about diplomacy and foreign service that needs to be processed through the committee and the congress and the country as we examine the events of men ghazi. we have an expeditionary diplomatic corps, and they do face very real risks every day, day in and day out. bad things have happened before, and bad things will happen again, unfortunately, in the future. there will always be a tension between the diplomatic imperative to get outside the wire and the security standards that require our diplomats to work behind high walls and full-body searches. we do not want to conner is tee that wire america off from the world. our challenge is to strike a balance between the necessity of the mission, available resou
with stephen dinan. our guest is stephen moore with "the wall street journal." then a look back at columbine shootings with david cullen. "washington journal" is live at 7:00 a.m. eastern here on c- span. >> as president obama begins his second term, what are the most important issues to consider in 2013? tell us. >> kagel you are in grade 6-12, make a video about what you would like to say to the president. >> get your chance to win the grand prize of $5,000. the deadline is january 18. for more information, go to studentcam.org. >> today, president obama nominated senior massachusetts senator john kerry for secretary of state. he is a vietnam war veteran and chairman of the senate foreign lakers -- senate foreign relations committee. this is just under 10 minutes. >> good afternoon, everyone. you know, when i took office, our nation was engaged in two wars and al qaida was entrenched in their safe havens. many of our alliances were frayed and america's standing in the world had suffered. over the past four years, we've begun a new era of american leadership. we ended the war in iraq. we pu
, he's got me. host: stephen, who did you vote for in 2008? in 2012.ean caller: i voted for president obama. i really liked mitt romney. why do i have to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? that really bugged me. host: that is stephen from connecticut. tyrone is a republican from the bronx. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate in 2016. i think she handled the middle eastern issue to the best of her ability. also, as far as the gop is concerned, i think she has made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that are coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house was let's fix this problem by incorporating a small businesses and less government intervention to curb the deficit. it has been astronomical. then i heard barack obama say the way we are going to do it is by making more cuts in various ways. he was saying by making more cuts and the only people it is going to hurt is the working class and somewhat of the mid
interesting to see those political documents falling after his name. host: stephen, thank you so much. we have been talking this morning about the shooting on friday in connecticut. president obama will be headed to new town this evening. he will be attending a memorial service and he will speak at an interfaith vigil for the families and the victims. he will be meeting with the families and he will be thanking the first responders. all of that this evening on c- span. we will be right here. something else that we are doing right now this holiday season is looking at the chaplains who work in the building behind us in the u.s. capitol. you can find more information about this on our facebook page. you will be able to see who these people are, their biographies, and you will be able to learn more information about them. coming up next, we will be learning more about the so- called fiscal cliff. later on, the president of dreamworks will talk to us about the future of the tree -- the tea party. >> coming up later, we will vieira network tv talk shows on c-span radio. the focus on all of those sh
that is needed. ambassador stephens was a proud californian. -- stevens was a proud californian. i will get to my question. i guess i will ask it straight out -- do you plan in the next budget to request funding levels that are necessary for protecting all of our facilities? >> the answer to that is yes, senator. i am aware that we are under constraints. i remind the committee that for everything we do at the state department, that includes protecting overt 275 locations around the world, the assistance we provide including to israel, everything we do at the state department is less than 1% of our federal budget. >> my question is, are you going to submit to us the plan and the money request do believe you need and paying attention to fiscal constraints? will that be what you truly believe? because i hope so. you cannot count on us to know what the needs are. >> there is no question. we have been ordered to come to congress and the med the 2013 budget requests -- and amend the 2013 budget requests. to add money for our construction costs and to increase diplomatic security for about 5%. we are in
the america's financial future. here is stephen ohlemacher. thank you for being here. how many people in america receive social security? >> a little bit more than 56 million people get social security. the average benefit is a little over $1,200 a month. so maybe it is like $13,000, $14,000 a year. >> we're talking about retirees but also the disabled. >> yes, fairly wide group of people get social security benefits, retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, widowers. it is a fairly big social safety net of people who get social security benefits. >> as you mentioned about 56 million the retirees received a $1,2 a month. there is also the s.s.i. about $500 a month. how does social security get financed? >> it has been a self funded program. it is funded by payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. you make more than that then any money you make over that is not taxed for social security. it is divided equally between your employer and the worker. for the past two years, the workers share has been reduced. that has saved, by the way, if you
corridor infrastructure, stephen gardner. >> he will be in here when we do the northeast corridor. i would love to have him. >> we will just subpoena him as a last act. >> i have to now wipe the smile off of joe mccue's face. >> he did not have a smile. >> we have moved forward in the business lines. the other piece of this, had i not been so long winded and other parts of what i said earlier, is the major part of this. -- matrix part of this. chief engineer, chief safety officer. they set the standards and the budget necessary for the business line chiefs to carry out so you have not just the customer focus, but a bottom- line focus, and there is the expertise that is their necessary for us to make improvements in mechanical maintenance and improving safety and all the things that are needed to support these general managers to get their jobs done. some of them are filled, some of them are posted, and they will be finished off in this organization. >> i look at the areas in which we're losing money, or you may be losing some opportunities in providing some service. another area that the i
in massachusetts. he ran against scott brown and loss. congressman stephen lynch. name out of contention is ted kennedy, jr. he will not seek the seat. he was speculated to seek the seat of his late father. the decision to buck the dying inouye. senator daniel in a the swearing-in took place yesterday with joe biden. brian schatz becomes the senior senator with the new congress being formed on january the third. on the independent line -- jack on the independent line. caller: good morning. i bet a co-worker that we are going over the fiscal cliff. it is more of a slope than a cliff. it would be a year of complete in activity before we would see the real bite of everything, all of the doom that is being forecasted. i am reminded of erskine bowles and alan simpson. about three weeks ago or four weeks ago, they met with the president and members of congress and discuss their feelings afterwards with the press. erskine bowles said he felt there was a third of a chance that there would be a deal and a third of a chance no deal and a third there would be no deal until after we went past the january 1
's got me. host: that's stephen, independent. who did you vote for in 2008? i mean in 2012. it's 2012 now. caller: i voted for president obama and i really, really liked mitt romney. i thought he had a great personality but you know, why do i got to pay less taxes than my friend from massachusetts? so that really bugged me. host: stephen an independent in connecticut. tyrone is a republican in the bronx. caller: hi, how you doing. host: i'm good. caller: i think hillary clinton would be an excellent candidate for 2016, i think she handled the middle eastern issue, libya, to the best of her ability and also as far as the g.o.p. is concerned, inshe's made strides toward eliminating the tax spending through various commitments with private entities and organizations that coming out of the woodwork. i was watching earlier today and what they were requesting from the white house as far as step up to the plit, pleths fix this problem by incorporating small businesses and less government intervention to somewhat sush the deficit considering it's been astronomical. i heard barack obama say, the w
-founder of nextell. stephen case was co-founder of america online. he is a rabid twitterer. i feel like i know all the details of your life. he is a relentless opponent of entrepreneurship. we are very fortunate to have these three panelists. they each get five to seven minutes. i think we will get through it. five to seven minutes to discuss the topic. we will have a conversation among us. then we will open it up to you. hopefully we will get to all the -- all of your comments and questions. we'll start with professor sullivan. >> i am delighted to be here this evening. not only because the topic is important and the panelists are interesting, but because this conference recognizes mort kaplan, somebody i am pleased to have the opportunity to speak on behalf of tonight. we're looking tonight at immigration policy and how it affects our -- our ability to attract high skilled immigrants. we're speaking of scientists, engineers, but reports who contribute to innovation. it is an issue that has a lot of implications for higher education. colleges and universities are in the talent business. we are in
to be in the army. i was in there in the don't ask don't tell days. i am not entered the army anymore. host: stephen is from las vegas on the democrats' line. caller: i just have to comment that the craziness of the culture war. my views are probably very left wing it. i have been watching all of the craziness go on. they are going on and on. this is all constitutional rights. i think it is crazy either party focuses on the ideology of the issue. we need to focus on the economic issues of our country and give everybody a constitutional right to live their life how they want to. host: what do you think about the current makeup of the court? caller: i think they honestly should just grant the rights whether at state level or national level. if it starts state-by-state, that is how it should start. it is becoming more progressive, despite what a lot of people want to say. this we are a center-right country, i do not believe we are. i think this election just proved it. i think the only reason the war -- the right wing has gained a their benefits in 2012 is because they were angry about the economic iss
bit on that subject from the new york times. that is from the new york times today. stephen from indiana is next on our independent line. good morning. caller: good morning. i will tell you, these breaks did not help when they started in. 2000 or in. how come is a point to hurt so bad when they removed them? we are talking $10 or $20 a week. everybody acts like it's thousands of dollars. so much money can help everybody out. itlet it expire. we have debts from the two wars and that's why we are in debt. that's my opinion. thank you. on twitter -- on wall street journal article. you can read more that in today's wall street journal. i want to bring in jim from franklin, tennessee, on the republican line. caller: thank you. i appreciate your taking my call today. i have been listening very closely to c-span for a long time. i particularly listen to what the democrats are saying, because i am always trying to figure out what they want. i boiled it down to four things. they want to tax more, spend more, increased the national debt, and blame everything on republicans. that is really
different ways. we appreciate your service. we remember that ambassador stephens was a hallmark of what foreign service was all about. our challenge here and abroad in the context of terrorism is that the terrorists only have to be lucky once. we have to get it right when hundred percent of the time. it is a heavy burden. it is not an easy one. this time we do not get it right obviously. the state acknowledges where it made a mistake. i find it extraordinary that congress passed blame on one side and never seem to take responsibility of its own. i still hear voices that will not accept responsibility. i hear from 18 accountability boards. this may be the first it i am not mistaken. obviously this is going back over administrations. you cannot implement the recommendations if one is about the resources and you do not have the resources by congress to meet those recommendations. the state and the congress should look at the responsibility to protect our embassies and diplomatic personnel abroad. reading directly from the unclassified section of the report, the accountability review board
and the negotiations over america's financial future, is stephen ohlemacher, joining us from the associated press, where he is a reporter. thank you for being here. guest: thank you. host: how many people in america receive social security? guest: a little bit more than 56 million people get social security. the average benefit is a little over $1,200 a month. so maybe it is like $13,000, $14,000 a year. host: we're talking about retirees but also the disabled. guest: yes, fairly wide group of people get social security benefits, retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, widowers. it is a fairly big social safety net of people who get social security benefits. host: as you mentioned about 56 million the retirees received a $1,2 a month. there is also the s.s.i. about $500 a month. how does social security get financed? guest: it has been a self funded program. it is funded by payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. you make more than that then any money you make over that is not taxed for social security. it is divided equally between your employer an
democrats and republicans come together to send it across to the white house. >> stephen dennis, thank you so much for your time. >> absolutely. >> here are president obama's remarks from the white house earlier today. afterwards, we will hear from senators reid and mcconnell from the senate floor. [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] [captioning performed by national captioning institute] >> good afternoon, everybody. for the past couple of months, i have been working with leaders of both parties to try to forge an agreement that would grow our economy and shrink the deficit, a balanced plan that would cut spending in a responsible way but also ask wealthy americans to pay more and protect our middle-class and everyone striving to get into the middle class. i want to get this done. it is the right thing to do for our families, businesses, and our economy, but the hour for immediate action is here. it is now. we are at the point where in four days every american's tax rates are scheduled to go up by law. every americans' paychecks will get considerably smaller. that wou
schwarzkop died at the age of 78. supreme court justice stephen briar talks about the united states constitution and the history of the rule of law. this interview was part of a discussion on china opposed the legal system hosted by the brookings institution. china's >> ok. concepts. for 20 years i have been advising -- roughly half of that on financial economic matters. the other half a variety of topics. about 10 years ago, we started talking about role of law. i said to him at the time, what strikes me about this topic was that other than the occasion i can think of, other than when paul worked at the state department and bill clinton was president, this topic in my view has never gotten the attention it deserves. it has been treated too much as a technical topic. not as a fundamental topic about the relations of the states. in my experience, i always say the chinese leadership, the most distinctive characteristic is they are systematically opened. that is to say the modus operandi is on a particular topic, let's look for the best ideas throughout the world, bring them back, stud
it is involved in the discussions, the negotiations over america's financial future, is stephen ohlemacher, joining us from the associated press, where he is a reporter. how much social security do people get? guest: a little more than 66 million people. the average benefit is a little over $12,000 -- a little over $1,200 a month. maybe $13,000 a year or so. host: we are talking about retirees and the disabled. guest: a fairly wide group of people receive social security benefits. retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, widowers. a big safety net of people. host: retirees receive about $1,200 a month on average. the benefits for the disabled, $1,100 a month on average. how does social security get financed? guest: it has been a self-funded program since its inception. it is funded by payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. if you make more than that, any money you make over that is not taxed as part of social security. the tax is divided equally between your employer and the worker. for the past two years, the workers' share of 6.2% has been
times" stephen diner, and also the professor of politics at asu. thank you. take it away. >> hello. good to have you here. i am a politics editor at "the washington times. " i think you can learn a lot about the national stage from the latino voter, from what went on in arizona, particularly the limits, test the limits of what we can learn about latino voters and their effect on the electoral politics and on policy. i guess i would like to start with a basic question. if someone were to ask me, what the white voter is? i would have no clue how to answer that question. what is the latino voter in arizona? how much of the electorate, how much of the population, is to listen rate, who is that person. as many of the audience know, the latino population is very perverse. mexican-american, cupid and porter ricans. the latino population is like in neighboring states, primarily of mexican origin. one thing that is unique is a lot of them are recent arrivals, not necessarily for a-porn, but having migrated from california to new mexico because the drop of jobs opportunity if the past decade or so
that connection. so the whole idea you bring up, stephen, that you believe that -- to connect the taxes they are paying with what they are getting in some respects, i agree with you and that is one of the challenges. on the first point, i take exception to you saying that my request for raising the cap on social security is a knee-jerk reaction. knee-jerk reaction is a description of somebody just sort of making a decision without thinking about it. i have put a lot of thought on the issue. you and i may disagree on the best solution but i put a lot of thought into it and i think it is the best solution. it may be a solution i am not successful at achieving in terms of a final deal. but if you want to look at the long-term solvency of social security, it is a great way to address it. >> -- host: just a few thoughts, first from our facebook page from a viewer. guest: on the first point about dreams versus reality, i think that what happened last night on capitol hill, the house republican conference will, in fact, help folks realize that it is going to take a bipartisan bill. you can't r
would you feel? >> just on the j.f.k. assasination thing. i just read one of stephen king's new books which is about the assasination and a man who has the ability to go back in time and tries to stop the assasination of j.f.k. does that mean we should put a thing on the front and say this didn't happen? at what point is it someone's responsibility to find out whether there is a backing up of that argument. it seems ridiculous when it's about time travel because there is no time travel yet. to a lot of people that would be absurd, where is that line? it's a gray area. >> i think the answer to somebody who will look at -- watch "24" and say see didn't i tell you americans are torture amongers. it goes to the old question of what is the effect, what's the cause and what's the effect of art and on public perception and behavior. would i personally feel responsible? i thought about it and i do think we all bear some responsibility but not complete responsibility. so somebody who doesn't have a critical capacity to turn on a television and realize this is fiction, this is not a representat
would like to talk a little bit about the fact that stephens said something about the one republican senator. what about harry reid and the veto on everything that comes from the house if he does not like it? the filibuster is that harry reid can decide he will not take it up, but they cannot filibuster? guest: first of all, the filibuster is not in the constitution. it is not a pocket veto, but it is something only the president can do. you are right in the sense that the majority is what determines what the agenda will be. john boehner decides what will come to the floor and when. you just saw it in the house. the unwillingness of john boehner to take up the extended tax cuts. this is not anything new. this is a long tradition in both houses. you have a split congress with both sides not working together. you are exactly right, this is the majority of one house, moving into the other. host: are you still there? caller: i agree with his explanation, but everything comes across two very read and he does not bring it up for a vote, then my senator, that meet stabbed now -- at least ca
larson on the fiscal cliff negotiations. after that, we will hear from stephen ohlemacher. you can see "washington journal" everyday life at 7 p.m. -- 7 a.m. eastern here on c-span. coming up next on c-span, the in going an upcoming german discusses what they want to see and a and budget deal. then david walker and rudy penner discuss the fiscal cliff negotiations. later, a discussion on the potential impacts of the negotiations and state budgets. >> the white house was very controversial, as most americans were. they designed washington city. there was competition. he designed a design for a palace. it was not particularly awe- inspiring. in fact, a european diplomat told congress it was neither large or awe-inspiring. but the answer the congressman gave was the building serves its purpose. it is larger and more elegant. photo mer new york times bodh critic on the white house. watch it on sunday on c-span three on "american history tv per." >> congressman steve scalise and jim jordan. >> thank you for coming. to delighted to welcome you a presentation by the outgoing and incoming chai
joins us from the role call as a white house reporter. stephen, how did the meeting between the president and congressional leaders go? >> i think it was a meeting where they may be set the framework for getting a short- term deal to avert tax increases for most americans, extend unemployment benefits, and maybe take care of a few other small things. at this point, it is a race against the clock and it is up to harry reid and mitch mcconnell and the senate to see if they can have a bipartisan compromise. the president said if he cannot come up with something in the next couple days, he wants harry reid to bring a bill to the floor that would do with the president wants to do, which is tax increases, extend unemployment benefits, etcetera, at least get a vote on it. harry reid has announced that he will prepare that bill and in the meantime he is trying to reach agreement with mcconnell that would be a bipartisan bill and hopefully get through both chambers in time to beat the clock for 2013. >> were any details discussed at the meeting? >> they did sort of go over some outli
the program is stephen olmacher, joining us from the associated press. how many people in america receive social security? how much social security to people get? guest: >> 66 million people. the average benefit is a little over $12,000 -- a little over $1,200 a month. maybe $13,000 a year or so. host: we are talking about retirees and the disabled. guest: a fairly wide group of people receive social security benefits. retired workers, spouses, children, disabled workers, widows, woodward's. -- widowers. a big safety net of people. host: retirees receive about $1,200 a month on average. the benefits for the disabled, $1,100 a month on average. how does social security get financed? guest: it has been a self-funded program since its inception. it is funded by payroll taxes. there's a 12.4% tax on wages up to about $110,000. if you make more than that, any money you make over that is not taxed as part of social security. the tax is divided equally between your employer and the worker. for the past two years, the workers' share of 6.2% has been reduced temporarily to 4.2%. as the temporary t
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)

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